Home Opinion Why I Decide to Try Brave Browser 1.0
Brave 1.0

Why I Decide to Try Brave Browser 1.0

by Abubakar Musa Usman

If you’d ask me which software you’re using the most on your phone, then I’d call a web browser easily. Google Chrome and Firefox are the first web browser options for many users. But in the industry, of course, there are many alternatives that give users some compelling features.

Brave 1.0 is one of those browsers that attempts to make its name by sailing on the privacy vessel. It comes loaded with robust features that help users through the internet-wide monitoring.

Also Read: Should You Switch to Firefox Quantum?

Yes, it’s primary appeal is the very fact that in the name of the commercial, people are being tracked, monitored and evaluated all the time. You don’t always want to be watched. Will you? But if we want stuff for free, that’s the truth we need to embrace.

Pros

  • Privacy and Security: Brave Browser offers a safe navigation experience. Everywhere, the browser switches automatically to ensure secure and authenticated data traffic with features such as HTTPs. Often, the app supports security. It offers private browsing mode for incognito.
  • Speed: It provides performance, fast speed by loading pages faster as a chromium-based browser.
  • Helps Content Creators: It helps publishers through the Brave Rewards program by asking their audience for a donation. It also charges to watch commercials for its clients.
  • It blocks ads: the ad-blocking function is known. Brave app helps to avoid advertisements when surfing and delete trackers.
  • Chrome Extension Support: This supports most of the Chrome Web Store extensions.
  • It supports various payment methods: Brave app has a built-in BAT wallet for transaction receipts. For Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and BAT, you will finance the wallet. You can also use Uphold’s credit card to make payment.

Cons

  • It’s sluggish when the desktop version opens too many tabs.
  • As a new browser, a novice will consider the window very complicated.
  • By blocking Ads, internet publishers ‘ ads on the browser is removed.

Summary

Brave is a web browser that provides a web browsing experience of high quality. It has an ad-blocking feature that, when surfing, gets rid of advertisements. It’s available on different devices, i.e. Android, iOS, Mac, Linux, Windows OS. Brave bonus sharing program allows content providers and advertisers to benefit from their audience. It supports Bitcoin, Ethereum, BAT, etc. cryptocurrencies. It’s nice to use Brave Browser. Consult the website for more information about the project.

Brave 1.0

Brave launched back in 2015 and the open-source browser is now free for all major platforms including Windows 10, macOS, Android,iOS, etc. The web browser developers have just hit a major milestone with the release of Brave 1.0 for the masses. Brave is also based on Chromium, just like Torch and Opera, but the app seeks to shed the part of Google as much as it can.

Brave 1.0

You will remember here that the individual builds should start with the same number of variants. The new one right now, for example, is 0.71, which is called Brave 1.0.

Nonetheless, there are many browsers based on Chromium. Microsoft’s Edge, for example, now also has the same soul as Brave. Yeah, it’s not much different from the initial experience you get with these browsers. Brave also feels like a different shell on Google Chrome

There are improvements, though, and they’re true. Some of Brave’s apps render it much more than just a web browser. Without ever leaving the Brave app, you can access the Tor network, run torrent files, control crypto wallets.

In contrast, Brave also leverages the functionality of Chromium. Like that, you can create multiple profiles, get support from Chromecast, and add extensions to Chrome without much trouble.

But still, an app needs to offer something special to survive the tough competition. And that’s what Brave’s designers have been up to for the last few years. They try to fix the most irritating but important part of the internet – advertising.

Brave Reward

Brave comes with an integrated ad-blocker called Brave Shield that blocks any ad that falls in its way, thus speeding up load times on the website. But for many blogs, including ours, such advertisements are the bread and butter. They also created a distributed compensation system for that.

Brave Rewards is a program that allows users to earn some money from the side to display appropriate advertisements thrown at them by the app. The idea is to create a win – win situation where users are free to visit websites and when their advertisements are blocked, content creators will not suffer the losses as well.

The money you earn as a BAT (Basic Attention Token) can be contributed on YouTube, Twitter, and Twitch to sites and creators whose ads you end up preventing. It’s called a tip, and when you find their material very interesting, it’s seen as a thank you note.

Typical Brave Rewards users are estimated to be able to earn about $5 a month (20 BAT). The cost doesn’t seem much, but it can easily make your broadband connection free for a few months if you extend it for a year. Payouts are given quarterly for the BATs you receive. Brave Rewards have been checked by the development team for almost a year. The loyalty program has now received a full rollout with Brave 1.0.

Brave 1.0: What’s more?

Besides all this, Brave also comes with support for the companion extension of IPFS (Interplanetary File System). It is a modern way to store content on the web which blends Git’s likes (acts like a versioned file system that keeps files and versions over time) and BitTorrent (files are stored across a distributed decentralized network).

Therefore, in order to get information, one does not need to rely on a central server, as is the case with HTTP. For IPFS, data monitoring is maintained using the file’s cryptographic hash. This allows the user to collect information from the nearest possible source.

There were no visible lags and freezes during daily use. Stability is one feature you will find enhanced nowadays in nearly all popular browsers.

I opened about 100 new tab pages to see what’s going on, bumping up the difficulty level. When switching between tabs, I noticed a slight delay in loading data, but there was no significant reduction in load times on websites.

Speaking of the figures, benchmarks show that Brave certainly gives biggies such as Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Opera tough competition. Note: Brave will provide these numbers. We’re going to try and review this article in the future with my own results.

Now, the time has come for the main question: will you turn to the Brave Browser?

Google’s profile sync is the only thing missing in this web browser. So if you can do without it, it may turn out that Brave software is a great option. Don’t forget, this app gives you real money as well.

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